Sunday, November 24, 2013

Around the World With Sharks

Reading Fly Guy Presents Sharks to Nutmeg, a therapy dog, November 2013.
I am reading Fly Guy Presents Sharks by Tedd Arnold.  I got to read this book to Nutmeg, a therapy dog who came to our school for a poetry event.  Some fun facts about sharks is that they are fish. There are over 400 different types of sharks in the world and they all have amazing abilities.  They live in bodies of water all over the world - even in lakes and rivers!  I have never seen a shark in the ocean or a lake or a river before - have you?  I've only seen sharks at the aquarium.  I go to Cape Cod in the summer and Shark Week is in August.  The town of Chatham has lots of shark sightings (lots of great white sharks) during the summer because of the seals.  We do not going swimming in Chatham in August!

Some more fun facts: A shark's skeleton is made of cartilage. Sharks don't have any bones.  I have a shark tooth necklace because shark teeth fall out all the time and they grow new teeth.  They also have many rows of teeth, but only the front row is used for eating.  Sharks use their sharp teeth to rip its prey and they swallow it without even chewing!  

Not all sharks eat meat. The whale shark is the largest shark in the world. It eats a small plant called plankton and other tiny plants. I learned that most sharks have rough skin made of denticles.  It feels hard and sharp. Denticles protect sharks from harm.  Nurse sharks have smoother skin than most sharks and it feels like sandpaper.  My favorite shark is the tiger shark and he is the most aggressive along with the bull shark and great white shark.

Did you know that the goblin shark is pink?  I hope someone has seen a goblin shark before, so you can tell me more about them.  Please tell me where you live and fun facts about sharks that live near you.  I'm going to map all the shark facts on a world map.


30 comments:

  1. Aloha Curran,
    Wow! Great information about sharks! We have had more than our share of shark attacks here in Hawaii. I have never heard of a goblin shark nor did I know it was pink. I will have to research that one. Using a world map to use as a place for your information sounds like a good idea. We'll be in touch with our facts soon.
    A hui hou!
    JoAnn Jacobs

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    1. Do you think this really happened in Hawaii? Does megalodon still exist? http://dsc.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/videos/megalodon-monster-shark.htm

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  2. Hi Curran,
    I had to share your page with my sister, because she is a huge fan of sharks. You gave us lots of interesting facts. Are sharks your favorite animal?
    I live next to the Farmington River in Simsbury, CT - I hope there are no sharks in there because I like to swim!
    Looking forward to reading your next blog and have a Happy Thanksgiving
    From,
    Jessie

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    1. My favorite animal is a jaguar, but I like sharks too.

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  3. Yikes! I know nothing about sharks except what you've already told me (well, I knew LESS before you wrote this post)! I've just got to know - did Nutmeg listen to you read the book? (I'm going on a tangent, but I have to say I love therapy dogs, and would rather read about them... Fur over denticles for me any day!)

    Enjoy your learning - thanks for sharing with us!

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    1. Nutmeg was a great listener. She liked my book on sharks. I read to three therapy dogs at school on that day. My next post will be about dogs around the world.

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  4. Hi Curran,
    There are lots of sharks that swim around the waters of the British Isle. Most of them are also found in Europe too, some as far as Africa and Canada! There are about 35 different types of sharks that visit our waters. I don't think I'd like to encounter any of them in the water. The basking shark can be found off the coast of the North West of England (where I live) and around the Isle of Man. Their teeth aren't as big and sharp as some sharks, but there are still a lot of them and they swim round with their mouths open!
    Good luck with your shark quest! :)

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    1. I found your location on this map: http://www.mapsofworld.com/isle-of-man/location-map.html. The basking shark looks funny with his mouth always open: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UbeXqgTC7g8.

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  5. I absolutely love sharks!!! I am from Burlington, CT and have never seen sharks in this area.
    Did you know that the Megalodon, a shark which lived millions and millions of years ago, may have been more than sixty feet long! Now Megalodon fossils have been found throughout the globe.
    Happy shark fact hunting!

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    1. Do you know that sharks can jump out of the water? Megalodon is now my favorite shark after watching this: http://dsc.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/videos/megalodon-monster-shark.htm. What kind of sharks have you seen?

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    2. You are the coolest seven year old ever!
      I have actually swam with bonnet sharks and leopard sharks before in Florida which was really cool.
      Other than that I have seen some at aquariums in different places. A lot of aquariums have touch tanks for sharks now so you can say you touched a shark, no megalodons though.

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  6. Curran, You are amazing. I never heard of a goblin shark, but this is what I just learned: The goblin shark (Mitsukurina owstoni) is a rare, poorly understood species of deep-sea shark. Sometimes called a "living fossil", it is the only extant representative of the family Mitsukurinidae. This species looks unlike any other shark, with a long flattened snout, highly protrusible jaws containing prominent nail-like teeth, and pink coloration. It is usually between three and four meters (10–13 ft) long when mature, though it can grow considerably larger. Goblin sharks inhabit upper continental slopes, submarine canyons, and seamounts throughout the world at depths greater than 100 m (328 ft), with adults found deeper than juveniles.

    Various anatomical features of the goblin shark, such as its flabby body and small fins, suggest that it is sluggish in nature. This species hunts for teleost fishes, cephalopods and crustaceans both near the sea floor and in the middle of the water column. Its long snout is covered with ampullae of Lorenzini that enable it to sense minute electric fields produced by nearby prey, which it can snatch up by rapidly extending its jaws. Small numbers of goblin sharks are unintentionally caught by deepwater fisheries. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has assessed it as Least Concern, citing its wide distribution and low incidence of capture.

    Also saw some photos of the goblin at: http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=goblin+shark+pictures&qpvt=goblin+shark+pictures&FORM=IGRE. The goblin looks scary. I've seen some impressive sharks up close and personal -fortunately only in aquariums. One day I saw a number of small dead sharks, probably juvenile nurse sharks, washed up along the shore at Long Beach.
    I'll commrnt again when I learn more. Thanks for introducing me to goblins.... Allie

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    1. Look at this video about the megalodon shark: http://dsc.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/videos/megalodon-monster-shark.htm. Do you think he still exists? He is my new favorite shark. Megalodon vs. T-Rex? Megalodon will win every time!

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  7. Florida is a wicked-cool place to hunt for shark teeth!! Our state is actually a peninsula surrounded by salt water on three sides. Throughout the ages, our state has been sometimes more underwater and sometimes less underwater than it is today: http://www.dep.state.fl.us/geology/geologictopics/geohist-2.htm. Over this vast span of time, millions of sharks have swum over what are now riverbeds or beaches in Florida. This means there are thousands and thousands of shark teeth to be found in our rivers and on our beaches!!! There are lots of ways to hunt for them, but for a novice shark-teeth hunter, I would recommend a guided tour such as this one: http://www.dep.state.fl.us/geology/geologictopics/geohist-2.htm. I'd love to go shark-teeth hunting with you sometime :-)

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    1. Let's go on a shark tooth hunt! Where do we find them? Do we dig for them? Can we keep them after we find them?

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    2. Yes let's do it! I don't know exactly where we would find them, but I think the guide company would help with that. Also not sure if we dig for them, or kind of "pan" for them like gold nuggets! And yes, we could definitely keep any teeth we find!

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  8. Hi Curran,
    I am glad to see your posting again! I think you know shark more than I do. I just want to share a video from "Yao Ming On Shark Fin" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jko_q7g94eo
    You also may check this :http://www.sharktruth.com/learn/history-of-shark-fin-soup/

    BTW, I never eat shark fin soup. I like shark too.
    Best,
    Zhengjie

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    1. This is bad. We have to stop killing sharks for their fins.

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  9. Hi Curran,
    I was excited to read your post on sharks. You taught me a lot. I never heard of the goblin shark before. A pink shark would be pretty cool. I think a great white would have to be my favorite kind of shark. The other day, my friend posted pictures of her and her family swimming with sharks. Would you want to try that some day? I don't think I would be that brave.
    Have a Happy Thanksgiving with your family.
    Sincerely,
    Lauren

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    1. I don't want to go swimming with sharks either.

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  10. Curran, Just went to the website you wrote about and this was what I read: Page not available - may have been DEVOURED - technicians working on the site. FUNNY!! I'll try again later. I'm anxious to learn about the megalodon, your new favorite shark! Allie.

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  11. Shark skins can be used in products like leather. Hanna W.

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    1. This is bad. We should not kill sharks for leather.

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  12. Sharks are NOT good mothers. Once the egg is hatched or the pup is born (some lay eggs while some sharks give birth to live shark pups), the shark babies are on their own. No swimming or hunting lessons for the baby. Can you believe it?

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    1. I knew that. Glad I'm not a shark pup. Look at how they can jump: http://dsc.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/videos/great-white-sharks-jumping.htm

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  13. Hi Curran, I grew up on an island off the coast of Long Island. It's a barrier island, meaning it is an offshoot of the main island. To find out more about what a barrier island, visit this site:

    http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/conservation/issues/barrier-island.htm

    Where I lived, we had shark warnings throughout the summer, which meant we could not go swimming in the ocean. Thankfully, these were infrequent, but some people remained afraid still even when no sharks were sighted.

    Here is link to a shark sighting that occurred this summer at Atlantic Beach, a small town on the barrier island. I lived in this town for a few years when I came home in the summers from college.

    http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2013/07/29/safe-to-go-back-in-the-water-shark-sighting-sparks-caution-among-swimmers/

    This video about the shark sighting in Atlantic Beach tells about sharks and explains that getting bitten by a shark is far less likely than drowning in the ocean:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f26N5bWZPGM

    This same summer, a shark washed up on the beach in Long Beach, the beach where I grew up when I was about your age. You can see from both of these videos, sharks are common along the Long Beach and Atlantic Beach coastlines. Both of these towns are on the same barrier island. I think you will like this video because you get to see the washed up shark close up.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JxMgYWCuqsM

    So, you can see growing up on a small island has its excitement.

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  14. Just found a new video for you to watch about sharks in California at LaJolla, which is across the bay from San Francisco, which is one of my favorite cities, if not favorite city.
    Well here is the link to get to the video: "Hundreds of Leopard Sharks Spotted off California Coast"

    http://www.nbcconnecticut.com/news/national-international/Hundreds-of-Leopard-Sharks-Spotted-off-California-Coast-233535381.html?_osource=SocialFlowFB_CTBrand

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  15. Hi Curran!
    I just got back from the West coast of Florida. While my mom and brother were driving to get us from the airport, they saw an 8 foot alligator crossing the road! There was a mini traffic jam!
    I didn't see any sharks on this trip, but as a teen I was walking the beach and saw a 3-4 foot sand shark. I just read that sand sharks have an unusual way of hunting - they gulp air to help them float so that they don't have to move much as they approach their prey. It helps them be sneaky!
    Great blog post! I love learning all of these interesting things about sharks!

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  16. Hi Curran!

    I loved reading about your shark facts. I live in Las Vegas which is in Nevada and we don't have any sharks here. We do have a really cool aquarium called the Shark Reef at the Mandalay Bay. Online the Mandalay Bay says this about the aquarium:

    "No resort is complete without exotic natural wonders. At Shark Reef you can see all kinds — sawfish, giant rays, endangered green sea turtles, piranha, jellyfish and the rare golden crocodile, to name a few. In all, there are over 2,000 animals in 1.6 million gallons of water."

    I have been before and it is really awesome! You can walk through a tunnel and there are all sorts of sharks and other animals around you. Lastly, you can also feed stingrays, sea turtles, and even the sharks!

    There is a video on this website that you can check out.

    http://www.vegas.com/attractions/on-the-strip/mandalay-bay-shark-reef/

    Good luck on your shark adventures!

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